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Food Unit
Nursery Rhymes

Home

Food Packages
Food Word Wall
Guess the Secret Food
What did you have for breakfast?
My Favorite Foods Book
Food Songs
Nursery Rhymes
Food Poems
What did you have for lunch?
Milk
At The Supermarket
Restaurant Menus
Honey Cookies
Pancake Measuring
Candy graphing
The Carrot Seed
The Food Pyramid
It Looked Like Spilt Milk
Strega Nona
Learning Log
References and Resources

Objectives
To teach students several nursery rhymes with the food theme.
Being able to recite nursery rhymes is a strong indicator of early reading (Cunningham & Allington, 1999).
Students will be working on emergent literacy skills.
The nursery rhymes will allow them to pretend read, another indicator of early reading.

Materials
nursery rhymes - see attached lists
chart paper
markers

Procedure
1.Plan to teach a nursery rhyme or two a day.
2.As you are teaching the nursery rhyme, write it onto chart paper. Discuss with students what they notice (food words, letters, sounds, etc.). Repeat the nursery rhyme, pointing to each word as you go.
3.Leave the nursery rhymes up for students to read/pretend read.
4.Play a game in which you toss around a crumpled up piece of paper or soft ball. Whoever catches must say a nursery rhyme.


An apple a day,
Sends the doctor away.
Apple in the morning,
Doctor's warning.
Roast apple at night,
Starves the doctor outright.
Eat an apple before going to bed,
Knock the doctor on the head.
Three each day, seven days a week.
Ruddy apple, ruddy cheek.

Hot cross buns!
Hot cross buns!
One a penny, two a penny,
Hot cross buns!
Hot cross buns!
If you have no daughters,
give them to your sons!

Kookaburra sits in the old gum tree,
Merry, merry king of the bush is he.
Laugh, Kookaburra.
Laugh, Kookaburra,
Gay your life must be.
Kookaburra sits in the old gum tree,
Eating all the gumdrops he can see.
Stop, Kookaburra,
Stop, Kookaburra.
Leave some there for me.


Pease porridge hot,
Pease porridge cold,
Pease porridge in the pot,
Nine days old.
Some like it hot,
Some like it cold,
Some like it in the pot
Nine days old.

I scream,
you scream,
We all scream,
For ice cream!

If all the world were apple pie,
And all the sea were ink,
And all the trees were bread and cheese,
What would we have to drink?

I'm a little teapot short and stout,
Here is my handle, here is my spout.
When I get all steamed up, hear me shout.
Tip me over and poor me out.

Oh, do you know the muffin man,
the muffin man, the muffin man,
Oh, do you know the muffin man
That lives on Drury Lane?
Oh, yes, I know the muffin man,
the muffin man, the muffin man,
Oh, yes, I know the muffin man,
That lives on Drury Lane.
Betty Botter bought some butter,
But, she said, the butter's bitter.
If I put it in my batter,
It will make my batter bitter.
But a bit of better butter
Is sure to make my batter better.
So she bought a bit of butter
Better than her bitter butter,
And she put it in her batter,
And the batter was not bitter.
So 'twas better Betty Botter
Bought a bit of better butter.

Pat-a-cake, pat-a-cake,
Baker's man.
Bake me a cake as fast as you can.
Pat it and prick it,
And mark it with a T,
And put it in the oven
For Tommy and me.

Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers.
A peck of pickled peppers Peter Piper picked.
If Peter Piper picked a peck of picked peppers,
How many pickled peppers did Peter Piper pick?

To market, to market,
To buy a big pig,
Home again, home again,
Jiggety jig.
To market, to market,
To buy a big hog,
Home again, home again,
Jiggety jog.
To market, to market,
to buy a plum bun,
Home again, home again,
Market is done.

Peter, Peter, pumpkin-eater,
Had a wife and couldn't keep her.
He put her in a pumpkin shell,
And there he kept her very well.